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(RNS) Denominational leaders and chaplains with years of military service are calling on more churches to find ways to minister to the men and women who have recently returned from Iraq and Afghanistan. By Adelle M. Banks.

3 Comments

  1. I don’t have a master of divinity degree and I am no expert on returning military. As I read about the “Soul Repair Center” at Brite Divinity, however, I was forced to wonder where in all the definitions and curricula was Jesus. Where was the real solution to “feelings of survivor guilt, grief, shame, remorse, anger, despair, mistrust, and betrayal by authorities”?

    The only answer to these feelings is an acknowledgement of guilt, repentance, and acceptance of forgiveness through the cross. Trying to treat the human reaction to sin without acknowledging the sin is ludicrous.

  2. Thank you for this information and the invitation to “love your neighbor.” I think a coalition of congregations, mental health professionals, and community leaders centered in Marietta, GA—Care for the Troops—understands the need and is showing the way congregations of all sizes and locations can work together to meet the need. For a look at their mission and how they have organized to help: http://careforthetroops.org/overview_our_program.php

  3. Thank you for this information and the invitation to “love your neighbor.” I think a coalition of congregations, mental health professionals, and community leaders centered in Marietta, GA—Care for the Troops—understands the need and is showing the way congregations of all sizes and locations can work together to meet the need. For a look at their mission and how they have organized to help see their site: careforthetroops.org