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WASHINGTON (RNS) At a time when the ideals of compromise and collegiality seem like a distant dream in the nation's capital, an unusually diverse coalition of religious leaders is asking Americans to pray for civility. By Lauren Markoe.

7 Comments

  1. Oh, c’mon–civility. Let’s just have a little bigotry, rather than a lot. Let’s just compromise, split the difference and be a little sexist. Let’s compromise on social programs, and on the welfare state.

    So sorry: Republicans are the enemy. Beat the crap out of them–no holds barred. Because “civility” and compromise means betraying the people who depend upon the programs these detestable, stinking, wicket, hateful bigots are trying to block. No compromise–no surrender. Kill!

    • Nothing so good or acceptable as a little hate-speech from a liberal, right? Right out of Saul Alinsky’s playbook, Rules For Radicals, which he dedicated to Lucifer. By the way, Dear Leader studied that book intensively in college. His latest campaign showed it.

  1. […] Religion News Service: Faith leaders want Americans to pray for collegiality At a time when the ideals of compromise and collegiality seem like a distant dream in the nation’s capital, an unusually diverse coalition of religious leaders is asking Americans to pray for civility. “Through daily prayer, we are calling on the ‘better angels of our nature’ needed to sustain our nation and solve problems,” said the Rev. Peg Chemberlin, immediate past president of the National Council of Churches and one of the faith leaders taking part in “18 days of Prayer for the Nation.” Prayers begin Thursday (Jan. 3), the first day of the new Congress, and end on Jan. 21, the day of President Obama’s second inauguration. […]

  2. […] Religion News Service: Faith leaders want Americans to pray for collegiality At a time when the ideals of compromise and collegiality seem like a distant dream in the nation’s capital, an unusually diverse coalition of religious leaders is asking Americans to pray for civility. “Through daily prayer, we are calling on the ‘better angels of our nature’ needed to sustain our nation and solve problems,” said the Rev. Peg Chemberlin, immediate past president of the National Council of Churches and one of the faith leaders taking part in “18 days of Prayer for the Nation.” Prayers begin Thursday (Jan. 3), the first day of the new Congress, and end on Jan. 21, the day of President Obama’s second inauguration. […]

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