Active RNS subscribers and members can view this content at the RNS Archives website.

(RNS) Many people, including Jewish Americans, have a hard time believing that Jews could be struggling to put food on the table in the U.S. But kosher food banks say they know it's true. By Lauren Markoe.

6 Comments

  1. Cheap and filling meal.
    Wash in salt water then dry and cut into very small pieces a head of cabbage. Slowly saute (on low flame stirring constantly takes about 45 minutes) the cabbage in a couple of tablespoons of rice bran oil.
    Cook some wide egg noodles, drain and mix with the cabbage, flavour with salt, pepper sugar.

  2. I have found out over the last 5 years of un- and underemployment that Kashrut costs money. Shomer shabbat costs money. Unfortunately the community here (New Zealand) is run by the super-rich they don’t give a flying toss about poor Jews.

  1. […] Religion News Service: Hungry Jews in America? Kosher food pantries report growing need A 2011 survey of Jewish New Yorkers revealed that Jewish poverty has risen in the past decade and increased at a faster rate than poverty among other groups. One in five of the 1.7 million Jews in the New York area — the largest Jewish community in the nation — now live in poverty or near poverty. The study’s authors noted the proliferation of fervently Orthodox families — who, more than less observant Jews, shoulder the expense of Jewish schools and keeping kosher. For those Jews who do keep kosher — about 21 percent of the 5.3 million American Jews overall, according to the most recent National Jewish Population Survey — hard times mean particularly scant options for feeding a family, which, among the most religious Jews, tend to be large. That’s where kosher food pantries come in, to serve a clientele with very specific and relatively expensive dietary needs. […]

  2. […] Religion News Service: Hungry Jews in America? Kosher food pantries report growing need A 2011 survey of Jewish New Yorkers revealed that Jewish poverty has risen in the past decade and increased at a faster rate than poverty among other groups. One in five of the 1.7 million Jews in the New York area — the largest Jewish community in the nation — now live in poverty or near poverty. The study’s authors noted the proliferation of fervently Orthodox families — who, more than less observant Jews, shoulder the expense of Jewish schools and keeping kosher. For those Jews who do keep kosher — about 21 percent of the 5.3 million American Jews overall, according to the most recent National Jewish Population Survey — hard times mean particularly scant options for feeding a family, which, among the most religious Jews, tend to be large. That’s where kosher food pantries come in, to serve a clientele with very specific and relatively expensive dietary needs. […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Comments with many links may be automatically held for moderation.