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(RNS) The quake that hit Los Angeles last week was an ecclesiastical one: Archbishop Jose Gomez publicly rebuked his predecessor, Cardinal Roger Mahony, and stripped him of his official duties. But on reflection, it’s not clear that Mahony was punished at all.

14 Comments

  1. Cardinal Mahony (who should be prosecuted for covering up sex crimes against innocent kids) is still a cardinal and still vote for or become the pope. Just as convicted criminal Bishop Finn is also still “a priest in good standing”, who is running the KC diocese.

    They make up their own rules.. which is so disturbingly sad for all the victims of clergy sex abuse and for the protection of children.

    Keep in mind, the LA Archdiocese is not unique in how they handle sex crimes against kids. Each bishop/cardinal answers only to the pope. Outside law enforcement needs to get involved and investigated for crimes against humanity.

    Judy Jones, SNAP Midwest Associate Director, 636-433-2511. snapjudy@gmail.com,
    (Survivors Network of those Abused by Priests)

  2. “The cardinal would not be presiding at confirmation rites, Tamberg said, but as one local priest put it, confirmations are not popular tasks so ‘this is hardly a severe punishment!’”

    Who’s the source? Confirmations of young people are the one time a year the faithful are just about guaranteed to see and hear from one of their bishops, and a “teachable moment” for the young that most bishops I know relish. It appears Mr. Gibson is deliberately understating this effect of Archbishop Gomez’s decision.

  3. Archbishop Gomez may well have had this info under his hat, but didn’t move until the legal battle over the files was completed. I’m disinclined to criticize his timing. But he deserves no praise for doing what any of the rest of us might do. He’s mostly untouchable in this episode–the Vatican can’t act without triggering a PR disaster.

    More of the same. The bishops see moral responsibility as ending when they remove a predator and place him in treatment. If he falls off the wagon, it’s his moral dilemma, not the Church’s. The logic is clear, but seriously flawed. But it seems to be what Rome and its pocket episcopacy are running with. Talk about a lack of a sense of sin.

    • Lynne Newington

      And what of the children they bring into the world?
      I often wonder why there’s no voice from the belfry on that subject, possibly because they all have skeletons in their own closets!

  4. Confirmations are about as popular as weddings. Most priests I know dread, not the sacrament but the horrors that go along with it: the pushy mothers, the dads jockeying to get photos, the lay staff who all must have their own way, the battles over the music, and the half dressed brides and confirmadi… no, it’s hardly a punishment for Cardinal Mahony not to have to go through anymore.

  5. I left the church over 30 years ago (at 16) because I could see the hypocracy of men who tell lies branded in their conscience.(1Tim.4) These crimes and cover-ups hadn’t yet come to light. I can’t fathom how ANYONE could still be a Catholic… How BLIND or DULL-WITTED do you have to be to NOT SEE this institution doesn’t have God’s spirit or approval! Jesus himself said, “By their fruits you will know these men…” (Matt.7:15-20) 15 “Be on the watch for the false prophets that come to YOU in sheep’s covering, but inside they are ravenous wolves. 16 By their fruits YOU will recognize them. Never do people gather grapes from thorns or figs from thistles, do they? 17 Likewise every good tree produces fine fruit, but every rotten tree produces worthless fruit; 18 a good tree cannot bear worthless fruit, neither can a rotten tree produce fine fruit. 19 Every tree not producing fine fruit gets cut down and thrown into the fire. 20 Really, then, by their fruits YOU will recognize those [men].

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