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(RNS) Is it blasphemous to depict the Virgin of Guadalupe in a bikini sipping on a margarita? Brandeis gets an apology 35 years after "Happy Holocaust" shouts at a soccer match. And who's happier on Twitter: atheists or believers?

10 Comments

  1. Slow day today. I thought the Santa Fe poster was offensive (and I am not Roman Catholic and do not believe in visions) The illustration is offensive. Mark Silk’s blather about the Pope is also shallow and less than gratuitous attempt at humor. If I were CEO at Trinity College I would not want Mark Silk to claim he was our professor or posting stupidity in the name of Trinity .. so it reveals a lot about Trinity. The Pope may be trying to infuse honor back into oaths. Silk apparently knows nothing about honor.

  2. Well .. I wonders which Trinity College was it where Silk was a professor’ Googled it. It is claims to be a “liberal arts” college in Hartford (no mention of Christian faith). So the entire matter is a case of misrepresentation and allowing others to believe a representation that is false: (a) that the term “Trinity” is related to the Christian Trinity and (b) that Silk is a professor of religions (he is not). Now misrepresentation of a material fact (or failure to disclose a material fact) is a textbook definition of FRAUD. LOL .. and by golly that describes it to a “T” — the T in Trinity. The entire Silk offering is a case of FRAUD.

  3. Kevin Eckstrom

    Article author

    Old Dude: Please be careful about your assertions regarding both Trinity and Mark Silk. While Trinity College has no formal affiliation now, it once did. It was founded by Episcopalians: “Although its earliest heritage was Episcopalian, its principal founder and first president having been the Rt. Rev. Thomas Brownell, Bishop of the Episcopal Diocese of Connecticut, its charter prohibits the imposition of religious standards on any student, faculty members or other members of the college, consistent with the forces of religious diversity and toleration in force at the time.” The terms “liberal arts” and Christian are not mutually exclusive.

    So there’s no “fraud” in its name, and Mark Silk is indeed a professor at Trinity: http://caribou.cc.trincoll.edu/depts_csrpl/cvs/marksilkcv.htm

  4. 1st of all, congrat’s 2 you & your family on the twins 1st birthday. Twice the fun & twice the mess of a 1st birthday party. 2nd, Old Dude, what RNR were you reading? Definately not a slow news day and quite a bit of info in this edition of RNR. So much so that it will require me finding time to go back & look at the links more in detail later. Thirdly, while you do have the right to remain anon. by using Old Dude as your name if you’re going to make claims such as you did, at least have the courage to put your real name to them! I’m glad Kevin Eckstrom, ( hope I spelled that right) took the time to correct what you claimed to be fact. With that I’m off to the weekend too. Happy 1st birthday!

  5. Well I apologize for my assertions which as it turns out were not correct. You see I was mislead by the statement that Mark Silk was a professor or Religion a Trinity College. Not being an Ivy Leaguer or an eastern New Englander when I read that someone is a professor of Religion at a college called Trinity it is kind of like hearing that someone is the Service Supervisor a People’s Pontiac . You just kind of understand that the person so named is a well experienced auto mechanic at a Pontiac dealer but maybe that is entirely wrong because Pontiac no longer is connected to People’s which has now become a horse farm and the Service Supervisor does not supervise service but is actually the bookkeeper of a stock brokerage that rents space from People’s which is no longer a Pontiac dealer. It’s and honest mistake, but a mistake .. and so I apologize for making that mistake.

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