The U.S. Embassy in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia via http://1.usa.gov/1c2SPPX

The U.S. Embassy in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia courtesy Discover Diplomacy

The United States will keep many embassies in the Muslim world closed until Saturday due to a possible militant threat. The State Department’s global travel alert will remain in force until the end of August.

Today is the one-year anniversary of the shooting at a Sikh temple in Wisconsin that left six dead. The attack formed one unlikely alliance between a victim’s son and a former skinhead.

The trial for Nidal Malik Hasan, who allegedly shouted Arabic for “God is great” before killing 13 and wounding 30 at Fort Hood in 2009, starts Tuesday.

The Supreme Court will soon decide if CEOs can impose their religious convictions on the people who work for them. Leaders of Christian companies like Hobby Lobby complement business practices with religious principles.

The company that bought Newsweek may have ties to controversial religious leader David Jang, Buzzfeed and Christianity Today report.

For some Muslims, Ramadan–which ends this week–poses risks. Some 300 Algerians held a weekend protest lunch during fasting hours to protest persecution of people who refuse to observe Ramadan. The month is an important one for some businesses.

A Muslim woman was told to remove her “headware” during the Massachusetts bar exam.

T. M. Luhrmann looks at the impact of prayer, comparing it to video games and our imagination.

A pastry chef in the UK who was fired after he used non-kosher jam at a kosher bakery won a payout after  judges ruled he had been victimized and unfairly dismissed.

In feature-land CBS’s 60 Minutes re-aired a report on Mercy Ships, the world’s largest civilian hospital ship. The BBC has a fascinating piece on a Florida Christian community dedicated to helping sex offenders rebuild their lives.

Circumcision has become a popular tool for fighting HIV infection rates, and one chief has turned evangelistic for the practice.

An American scholar who has spoken widely on women’s role in Islam said that lectures scheduled in India were canceled amid security concerns.

The Senate has confirmed the former head of Catholic Relief Services to be the next ambassador to the Vatican.

Zimbabwe’s religious leaders called for peace Sunday after the country’s disputed election gave Robert Mugabe the victory.

Punk rockers in Myanmar are getting double-takes–not for their looks–for their willingness to speak out against Buddhist monks instigating violence against Muslims.

In sports, Tim Tebow has a special way with his fans. And Major League Baseball plans to announce today the fate of players who used performance enhancing drugs.

Tweets from the weekend:

Categories: Beliefs

Sarah Pulliam Bailey

Sarah Pulliam Bailey

Sarah Pulliam Bailey joined RNS as a national correspondent in 2013. She has previously served as managing editor of Odyssey Networks and online editor for Christianity Today.

12 Comments

  1. “The Supreme Court will soon decide if CEOs can impose their religious convictions on the people who work for them.” Really? While I am sure this is taken from the Slate article it refers to, I expected better from the Roundup. Sounds like a Bizzaro World characterization of the issue.

        • Sarah Pulliam Bailey

          Sarah Pulliam Bailey

          Article author

          EH, that could work, thanks. I’ve written about this subject to death, but I’m not making judgments either way, merely rounding up the news from the weekend.

          • I enjoy the Roundup each morning, and look forward to it hitting my inbox. I also enjoy the sometimes off the cuff commentary that comes with it, even when I do not agree with it. I do not think anyone can be fully objective, and everyone comes with their bias, prejudice, worldviews, etc. That one just irked me, though I do recognize that it was a grab from the Slate article. The “imposing their religious convictions” is close to being ridiculous compared to what the issue really involves. It is certainly not about an employer making someone go to church, pray, or recite the Nicene creed. It is about whether the government can mandate that an employer provide X that the employer sincerely believes violates it’s religious beliefs and conscience.

  2. I thought the statement was a bit biased, too, though I understand it’s a bit tricky to summarize in one sentence.

    These companies simply don’t want to pay for their employees’ birth control. They’re not outlawing birth control altogether. To say “impose their religious convictions” also ignores the status quo: These companies aren’t providing birth control to their employees now. It seems that the HHS Mandate is the entity doing the “imposing.”

    • Sarah Pulliam Bailey

      Sarah Pulliam Bailey

      Article author

      Thanks for your feedback. I’m not making a statement one way or another, but I know that the comment about the status quo isn’t the case for everyone opposing the HHS mandate. For instance:
      http://www.nytimes.com/2013/05/27/nyregion/new-york-archdiocese-reluctantly-paying-for-birth-control.html?pagewanted=all
      and http://thehill.com/blogs/healthwatch/legal-challenges/242167-report-wheaton-covered-morning-after-pill-before-suing-over-hhs-mandate

  3. You mean you Christians? don’t want 2 pay 4 peoples health coverage because it comes under a plan called Obama care. Not very Christiian to not let your employees get health coverage that comes at little to no cost to you is it? But then again Christ said You already have your reward didn’t he?

  4. I enjoy the Roundup each morning, and look forward to it hitting my inbox. I also enjoy the sometimes off the cuff commentary that comes with it, even when I do not agree with it. I do not think anyone can be fully objective, and everyone comes with their bias, prejudice, worldviews, etc. That one just irked me, though I do recognize that it was a grab from the Slate article. The “imposing their religious convictions” is close to being ridiculous compared to what the issue really involves. It is certainly not about an employer making someone go to church, pray, or recite the Nicene creed. It is about whether the government can mandate that an employer provide X that the employer sincerely believes violates it’s religious beliefs and conscience.

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