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(RNS) James Dobson will speak at the March for Life rally on Jan. 22, as part of a new strategy to expand the annual event's reach beyond its Catholic base to include evangelicals.


  1. The involvement of evangelicals does not help many causes. They are almost always extremists who suffer the awful problem of considering biblical writing as literal. They too often tend to extremes in their reactionary behavior toward those with whom they disagree. Their behavior, based on their literal and extreme beliefs, is the stuff of all that was evil in the history of religion. Their grasp of other branches of knowledge like history, science, sociology, and psychology is too often very minimal at best and seldom blended to moderate their extremes of understanding the ancient mythologies of biblical writings. That is what brings them to murder abortion doctors even inside churches.

    • gilhan,

      That is the problem. Evangelicals aren’t extremists. They are only doing as instructed:
      Jesus said, “Bring those my enemies and execute them in front of me.” (Luke 19:27)

      Morality is doing what is right, regardless of what you are told.
      Religion is doing what you are told, regardless of what is right.

      • Maybe I am not understanding correctly what this person is trying to say, but it frightens me.

      • Thanks, Max, for making gijcan’s point.

        Unthinking humanicans programmed with selective Bible verses. Lord, save us.

        • John,

          All of religion is extremist at its core.

          There is no escaping it because there are no checks and balances to stop it from being as crazy as anyone wants to make it.
          Jesus preached both love and hate so…. do either one and you have god on your side.

          Religion needs to die off.

      • @Atheist Max provides a great example of how often some atheists either misquote or twist the Bible for their own devious purposes. By isolating Luke 19:27 he completely ignores context and makes it sound as if Jesus is commanding that someone be executed. But if you read the context, it’s crystal clear Jesus was giving a parable and talking about a fictitious king.

        I find it interesting that you can do something like that in the name of “morality.”

        • LARRY Short,
          you are Wrong. And you are a sloppy Bible reader.

          Jesus is calling for EXECUTION OF ENEMIES at the hands of his followers.

          Look at the context and see that Jesus uses the fictitious NOBLEMAN as an EXAMPLE OF HIMSELF!

          Luke 19:11-27

          11 While they were listening to this, he went on to tell them a parable, because he was near Jerusalem and the people thought that the kingdom of God was going to appear at once. 12 He said: “A man of noble birth went to a distant country to have himself appointed king and then to return. 13 So he called ten of his servants and gave them ten minas.[a] ‘Put this money to work,’ he said, ‘until I come back.’

          14 “But his subjects hated him and sent a delegation after him to say, ‘We don’t want this man to be our king.’

          15 “He was made king, however, and returned home. Then he sent for the servants to whom he had given the money, in order to find out what they had gained with it.

          16 “The first one came and said, ‘Sir, your mina has earned ten more.’

          17 “‘Well done, my good servant!’ his master replied. ‘Because you have been trustworthy in a very small matter, take charge of ten cities.’

          18 “The second came and said, ‘Sir, your mina has earned five more.’

          19 “His master answered, ‘You take charge of five cities.’

          20 “Then another servant came and said, ‘Sir, here is your mina; I have kept it laid away in a piece of cloth. 21 I was afraid of you, because you are a hard man. You take out what you did not put in and reap what you did not sow.’

          22 “His master replied, ‘I will judge you by your own words, you wicked servant! You knew, did you, that I am a hard man, taking out what I did not put in, and reaping what I did not sow? 23 Why then didn’t you put my money on deposit, so that when I came back, I could have collected it with interest?’

          24 “Then he said to those standing by, ‘Take his mina away from him and give it to the one who has ten minas.’

          25 “‘Sir,’ they said, ‘he already has ten!’

          26 “He replied, ‘I tell you that to everyone who has, more will be given, but as for the one who has nothing, even what they have will be taken away. 27 But those enemies of mine who did not want me to be king over them—bring them here and KILL THEM in front of me.’”

          The original meaning of the parable was aimed at the scribes who had withheld “from their fellow men a due share in God’s gift,” according to most Lutherans. In this well accepted view, Jesus is saying that these scribes will soon be brought to account for what they have done with the Word of God which was entrusted to them.
          The Lutheran position also put forward by Joachim Jeremias and many Catholic theologian also believed that in the life of the early church the parable took on new meaning, with the merchant having become an ALLEGORY OF CHRIST HIMSELF so that “his journey has become the ascension, his subsequent return … has become the Parousia, which ushers his own into the Messianic banquet.”


          Hitler was fond of this more accepted interpretation which was so closely related to his love of Lutheranism which openly called for death to Jews.

          • @Max & Larry –

            The wider context of Luke 19 also shed light on whether Jesus is talking about himself as the king in the parable. Immediately following the verse given by Max is the triumphal entry of Jesus into Jerusalem, with praise and pomp befitting a king. It’s clear that the gospel writer (called “Luke”) was portraying Jesus as the king in parable, as part of Luke 19 which tells of Jesus as the king whose reign is soon to come. Whether or not Jesus actually said any of it is an open question, but beside the point because those who do read their chosen Bible as history will see Jesus telling his followers to kill in his name.

          • All parables are open to interpretation. And that is fine.

            But the problems begin when you attribute the parable to a God.
            Then the meanings become urgent, pressing, absolutist and for some fundamentalists even fanatic.

            The trouble with religion is it pretends an authority it does not deserve.

          • Thanks Max. Some quick thoughts:
            1) Believers of course scramble to defend a call to murder by their prince of peace (whether JC or Mohammed). Koran calls for killing non-believers and Islam followers pull the same stunt…OH NO! Misinterpretation. Our religion is all for PEACE.
            2) Why any sensible human would gives two figs about some soiled old texts cobbled together when we didn’t even know the earth orbited the sun, beats me.

            Grow up children. God is a dreary fiction.

    • I thought evangelicals were already vocal and active in anti-choice brouhahas

      I guess this one is a little different because it is usually Catholic organized. Evangelicals like to consider Catholics as heretics unless their political agendas intersect.

  2. I am NOT an evangelical, I am a Lutheran. But, Wow! Thank you for putting into words exactly why evangelical and mainline Protestants have been scared away from the March for Life for years. Your bigotry is appalling. Did you not bother to look at the numbers above. Protestants are MORE pro life than Catholics! Why don’t you go to youtube and listen to our Lutheran Church Missouri Synod President Matt Harrison discussing the HHR mandate. Maybe you would learn something about how to work together for God’s kingdom. Bigot handled…now a suggestion. Our system of Lutheran Concordia Universities sends busloads of students to March for Life every year. Perhaps you could reach out to Evangelical Universities as wellm

  3. Anything necessary, short of violence, to protect the over 27,000 innocent unborn children who killed each week mostly for reasons of convenience and comfort.

    State. Y stae, law by law these children will be saved.

    • Where does God say anything about the ‘sanctity of life’?

      “Thou shalt not murder” is not an affirmation of life.
      Especially since God commands capital punishment for almost every crime.

      Christians pretend God is good. There is no sign of it:

      “Ephraim shall bring forth his children to the murderer… Give them a miscarrying womb and dry breasts…they shall bear no fruit: yea though they bring forth, YET WILL I SLAY even the beloved fruit of their womb.” (Hosea 9:11-16)

    • FRANK,

      I do wonder where people get the idea that Christianity is a simple, clear, loving message. Jesus is so ready for violence and rage it makes you wonder how ‘peace’ and ‘love’ managed to rise to the top of this philosophy.


      “I have come to bring fire on the earth, and how I wish it were already kindled! But I have a baptism to undergo, and what constraint I am under until it is completed! Do you think I came to bring peace on Earth? No, I tell you, but division.” – Jesus – (Luke 12:49-51)

        • @ FRANK,
          Excuse me…but Where is it written?
          The only sanctity of human existence is tied to being a servant of the Lord. Hence we are valuable ONLY for our service to the Lord. As in “behold the Lillies of the field” and “temple of the holy spirit”.

          Life itself is not sanctified anywhere in the Bible.
          Only DEATH is sanctified repeatedly.

          “Whoever tries to keep their life will lose it, and whoever loses their life will preserve it.” (Luke 17:33)

          Do you mind telling me where God declares a sanctity of LIFE?
          I have never seen it.

        • FRANK, ……Embarrassed? Me?

          Why do I look even more foolish?


          I cannot find anything in the Bible which supports your claim that God cares about the sanctity of life of the body or mind – can you?
          “Thou shalt not murder” is joined by stoning to death the murderer.
          So this is not an affirmation of life.

          The Bible honors only DEATH of the body – not life:

          “We are confident, I say, and would prefer to be away from the body and at home with the Lord.” (2 Corinthians 5:8)

          “Then I heard a voice from heaven say, “Write: Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord from now on.” “Yes,” says the Spirit, “they will rest from their labor….” (Revelation: 14:31)

          “So will it be with the resurrection of the dead. The body that is sown is perishable, it is raised imperishable; it is sown in dishonor, it is raised in glory; it is sown in weakness, it is raised in power; it is sown a natural body, it is raised a spiritual body. If there is a natural body, there is also a spiritual body.” (1 Corinthians 15:42-45)

          “The righteous perish, and no one ponders it in his heart; devout men are taken away, and no one understands that the righteous are taken away to be spared from evil. Those who walk uprightly enter into peace; they find rest as they lie in death.” (Isaiah 57:1-2)

          “If we live, we live to the Lord; and if we die, we die to the Lord. So, whether we live or die, we belong to the Lord.” (Romans 14:8)

          “A good name is better than fine perfume, and the day of death better than the day of birth.” (Ecclesiastes 7:1)

          The Bible: “Life sucks”, but “Death is to die for.”
          What is the morality of this?

          I submit that only death is what God seems interested in:

  4. Great story on the new outreach effort by the March for Life organizers. I would add that along with Catholics, Missouri Synod Lutherans have long been actively participating in the march. We can find that Lutherans for Life have been actively marching since 1996 and LCMS Life Ministry has been organizing the church body’s participation in the march since 2008. Here’s a link to more information about The Lutheran Church–Missouri Synod’s participation in the 41st National March for Life:

    • why are you fighting so hard against a woman’s right to her own body?
      Don’t you believe that women have a right to what they do with their bodies?
      Do you realize women had to fight for centuries for the right to consult doctors without their husband’s permission?
      Do you want to eliminate all of that progress?

  5. I love that more groups are becoming pro-life–even atheists. I am hoping all the enthusiasm for life will translate into fully rejecting the culture of death. We must reject contraception before we can fully choose life.

    • Whaaat???

      You said, “I am hoping all the enthusiasm for life will translate into fully rejecting the culture of death. We must reject contraception before we can fully choose life.”

      Reject contraception??

      Are you nuts? The culture of death is called Christianity. When did Jesus start showing interest in human life? God wants you dead, not alive.

  6. All right, anti-abortionists.

    Let’s put your morality where your mouth is.

    Adopt an unwanted child, please, or two or three – Otherwise forever hold your peace.