NEW YORK (RNS) If the story of the Garden of Eden is such a common cultural reference point, what more can be said about it?

Patrons peruse the artwork in "Back to Eden: Contemporary Artists Wander the Garden," an exhibit at New York's Museum of Biblical Art. Photo courtesy Gina Fuentes Walker

Patrons peruse the artwork in “Back to Eden: Contemporary Artists Wander the Garden,” an exhibit at New York’s Museum of Biblical Art. Photo courtesy Gina Fuentes Walker Photo courtesy Gina Fuentes Walker


This image is available for Web and print publication. For questions, contact Sally Morrow.

Plenty, at least judging by a new exhibit at the Museum of Biblical Art, which is affiliated with the American Bible Society.

The famed narrative of Eden in the Book of Genesis has been the subject of “New Yorker cartoon after New Yorker cartoon,” said guest curator Jennifer Scanlan, noting the enduring power of the Eden narrative.

Couples solely wearing fig leaves remain “instantly recognizable as Adam and Eve and fruit trees inhabited by snakes as the Tree of Knowledge of Good and Evil with the serpent,” she writes in the exhibit catalog.

Yet even with archetypes that are so well-known, the themes contained in Genesis about the storied paradise where it all began can still capture the imagination of contemporary artists, who find in it new echoes, meanings and insights.

These can be about innocence and longing, earthly paradise and the challenges of being human, or the need to protect the earth from environmental disaster.

Environmental themes are particularly prominent in “Back to Eden: Contemporary Artists Wander the Garden,” which is on view at the museum through Sept. 28. The nearly two dozen pieces on display include paintings, sculptures, works on paper, and installations containing video elements.

"Dwarfed Blue Pine," by Rona Pondick, is a painted bronze sculpture that is being exhibited in "Back to Eden: Contemporary Artists Wander the Garden" at New York's Museum of Biblical Art.

“Dwarfed Blue Pine,” by Rona Pondick, is a painted bronze sculpture that is being exhibited in “Back to Eden: Contemporary Artists Wander the Garden” at New York’s Museum of Biblical Art. Photo courtesy Sonnabend Gallery, New York, and Galerie Thaddaeus Ropac, Paris/Salzburg


This image is available for Web and print publication. For questions, contact Sally Morrow.

Of particular interest to the environmentally minded, and those who like large-scale paintings, is Alexis Rockman’s striking and dystopian “Gowanus,” a 2013 work depicting the Gowanus Canal, a long-polluted Brooklyn site that, as museum notes describe it, is notorious among New Yorkers as a “toxic wasteland” reflecting “the disastrous potential for the destruction of nature” by humanity.

This “wandering” through the metaphorical garden has a new element for a museum that, up until now, has not commissioned works of art. Six of the works exhibited are products of MOBIA’s first-ever commissions. That is a fresh approach for a museum committed to art that, even if it is modern or contemporary, is rooted in a religious and narrative tradition.

“It shows a new direction,” said Scanlan, noting the new pieces have changed perspectives “about what a museum of biblical art can be.”

Richard Townsend, the museum’s director, agreed. He said the commissions had paid off by “opening up new avenues for the museum’s exploration of the Bible’s enduring influence on the visual and cultural landscape today,” as well as revealing “the influence of biblical narratives in today’s culture and society.”

“The story of Eden is a framework that gives contemporary artists access to universal themes,” he added, “speaking to age-old human desires and potential.”

"The Space Between Garden and Eve," by Adam Fuss, is a daguerreotype that is being exhibited in "Back to Eden: Contemporary Artists Wander the Garden" at New York's Museum of Biblical Art.

“The Space Between Garden and Eve,” by Adam Fuss, is a daguerreotype that is being exhibited in “Back to Eden: Contemporary Artists Wander the Garden” at New York’s Museum of Biblical Art. Photo courtesy Cheim & Reed, New York


This image is available for Web and print publication. For questions, contact Sally Morrow.

Not long ago, during a previous MOBIA exhibit, Bibles and biblical literature developed during two centuries of American wars filled one exhibit space. Now, that space is the site of an arresting video installation by artist Sean Capone, who created one of the commissioned pieces. With its shifting colors and images, Capone’s work suggests different connections to the Book of Genesis — from blank nothingness comes a video “garden” of constant flow, regeneration and change.

More concrete, but perhaps even more provocative, is Mark Dion’s diorama of a key player in the Eden tale: the serpent. This work, also a commissioned piece, gives the viewer a new take on the creature. Looking alert and adroit (and not to mention creepy), Dion’s serpent is depicted as it might have appeared before meeting its eternal fate as a creature forever slithering away on its belly.

The idea of Eden, Scanlan said, means different things to different people. It can be a place to return to; an enclosed space of harmony; a place of origin; or, more tragically, the birthplace of original sin. To many, “it just becomes a symbol of humanity at its most innocent,” she said.

And yet, there lies the serpent, too, the very antithesis of innocence.

KRE/AMB END HERLINGER

4 Comments

  1. Unfortunately, the earth did not expand to a paradise worldwide from the garden of Eden, where Adam and Eve lived, since they disobeyed God and sinned against him.

    However, the great news is that the paradise lost will soon be regained on earth through the upcoming 1,000 year rule of God’s kingdom or heavenly government, with Jesus as King, over mankind, after it has put an end to all of man’s governments (Daniel 2:44) and the war of Armageddon is victoriously won by God!!

    This is what we have to look forward to on a paradise earth:

    “Out of the stump of David’s family will grow a shoot — yes, a new branch bearing fruit from the old root. And the spirit of God will rest upon him (Jesus) — the spirit of wisdom and understanding, the spirit of counsel and might, the spirit of knowledge and fear of God.

    He will delight in obeying God. He will not judge by appearance nor make a decision based on hearsay.

    He will give justice to the poor, and make fair decisions for the exploited.

    The earth will shake at the force of his word, and one breath from his mouth will destroy the wicked. He will wear righteousness like a belt, and truth like an undergarment.

    In that day, the wolf and lamb will live together; the leopard will lie down with the baby goat. The calf and the yearling will be safe with the lion, and a little child will lead them all.

    The cow will graze near the bear. The cub and calf will lie down together. The lion will eat hay like a cow.

    The baby will play safely near the hole of a cobra. Yes, a little child will put its hand in a nest of deadly snakes without harm.

    Nothing will hurt or destroy in my holy mountain, for as the waters fill the sea, so the earth will be filled with people who know God.” Isaiah 11:1-9

    What grand blessings we have to look forward to from God and his son, Jesus!! :-D

    • Art,

      Revelation 20:2-7 shows that during the 1,000-yr. rule by Jesus and 144,000 born-again Christians referred to in verses 4-7 as well as Revelation 14:1-5, that Satan and his demons will be abyssed and mankind will be blessed not to have their influences during that reign.

      Revelation 20:7 brings out that Satan and his demons will be let loose after those 1,000-years as a final test on perfect mankind to prove their faith (as Adam and Eve had been tested).

      The great news is that after that test, Satan and his demons, and all those of mankind who follow them, will face eternal death as reflected at Revelation 20:10 where it speaks of the lake of fire.

      Mankind will thereafter live forever on a paradise earth, where old age, sickness and disease and death will be no more (Revelation 20:1-4). :-D

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