In this early WWII photo, members of the "City of the Immaculate," above, in Niepokalanow, Poland - including the Rev. Maximilian Kolbe, the institution's founder and a superior of the Franciscan community there - are marched away to a concentration camp. More than a year after his release, Father Kolbe was imprisoned a second time by the Nazis on Feb. 14, 1941, and eventually transferred from a Warsaw jail to the infamous death camp at Auschwitz, where he was to die later in place of one of 10 randomly selected prisoners. Kolbe died on Aug. 14, 1941 after being injected with a lethal dose of phenol. The heroic priest was canonized a saint of the Roman Catholic Church by Pope John Paul II in ceremonies on Oct. 10, 1982 at the Vatican. Religion New Service file photo

In this early WWII photo, members of the “City of the Immaculate,” above, in Niepokalanow, Poland – including the Rev. Maximilian Kolbe, the institution’s founder and a superior of the Franciscan community there – are marched away to a concentration camp. More than a year after his release, Father Kolbe was imprisoned a second time by the Nazis on Feb. 14, 1941, and eventually transferred from a Warsaw jail to the infamous death camp at Auschwitz, where he was to die later in place of one of 10 randomly selected prisoners. Kolbe died on Aug. 14, 1941 after being injected with a lethal dose of phenol. The heroic priest was canonized a saint of the Roman Catholic Church by Pope John Paul II in ceremonies on Oct. 10, 1982 at the Vatican. Religion New Service file photo

Sally Morrow

Sally Morrow

Sally Morrow joined Religion News Service in March 2012 as Photo/Multimedia Editor. She is a photographer and editor based in Kansas City, Mo. Morrow has worked as a multimedia editor and photographer at Newsday, The Des Moines Register, and the South Florida Sun-Sentinel.

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